Posted on Leave a comment

How To Use Polyester Wadding – 5 Simple Christmas Projects

How To Use Polyester Wadding

Polyester wadding is a product which might not be at the forefront of your mind when you think about sewing. We tend to focus on the beautiful fabrics, trims and buttons – the elements that are on display. However, without the polyester wadding, sometimes also known as batting, there are quite a few projects which could not be completed. Here are just 4 simple projects that use this unsung product.

Coaster or Placemats

You can protect your surfaces from marking from hot cups or dishes by making coasters or pot rests which contain a layer of heat resistant polyester wadding. Why not get some festive fabric and create a whole set of coasters as a Christmas gift? We found a simple DIY pattern to make 4 coasters using just a few materials or make a larger oblong to create padded table placemats to brighten up your festive table. 

Padded Table Runner

Nothing sets a dinner table off better than a beautiful table runner – your Christmas Dinner table wouldn’t look the same without one. As you may be resting warm dishes on the runner, it’s a good idea to use a layer of wadding inside the runner. If you have a spare afternoon, you can create a bold and bright runner or something a little more subdued depending on your festive theme. Polyester wadding, as long as it is heat resistant would be a good option as it’s less expensive than cotton wadding. 

Padded Christmas Tree Decorations

Wadding can also be used to create padded Christmas tree decorations using felt squares or fat quarters which come in a wide range of designs. This upcycling design uses old jeans material, festive fabric and batting to create a different look for your tree.

Children’s quilt for Christmas Eve

If a child in your life is reluctant to go to bed on Christmas Eve, perhaps this sweet little project will encourage them. How exciting to have a quilt that only goes on the bed once a year! We go into more detail on our other blog on how to make a child’s quilt – you can choose some Christmassy fabric or even have the child choose their favourite festive fabric.

Padded Christmas Stocking

No blog on Christmas sewing projects using wadding would be complete without a padded Christmas stocking to hang on the mantlepiece in anticipation of a visit from Santa. Check out this simple Christmas stocking pattern which you can complete in a morning. If you have time, why not make one for every member of the family?

Whatever your project, whether large or small, you can be certain that at Marent Crafts we will have wadding to suit most needs.
We’d love to see example of projects you’ve made that use our wadding, so please do send us your pictures. If you are into your Christmas sewing projects, why not also have a read of our other blog which gives you 14 more fun, yet straightforward suggestions.

For all of our latest updates, make sure you’re following us on socials:

Posted on

Learn more about sewing with an Easy Informative Guide To Sewing Products [2021 Edition]

An Informative Guide To Sewing Products

Sewing is a very popular pastime, but it is quite technical and can be a bit daunting for beginners. It’s a very therapeutic activity though and is well worth spending some time finding your way around all the different items you might need when completing a sewing project. We don’t have time to do a full A-Z here. But let’s demystify some of the sewing products that are commonly used.

What is wadding?

Wadding, also known as batting in the US, is often made from polyester fibres and is used as a layer of insulation between fabrics. Polyester wadding is often used in quilt making and helps you to produce a quilt that is soft, comfortable and warm. Quilt wadding may also be made from natural fibres such as bamboo, silk or cotton. These tend to flatten more than made-made fibres such as polyester. Natural fibres are more breathable whereas man-made tend to wash better. Bamboo wadding is becoming more popular as an eco-friendly alternative for quilting.

Wadding

Wadding is sold in different weights, commonly 2oz, 4oz and 6oz and can usually be purchased by the metre or half-metre. It may come scrim-coated which means there is a light net-like covering which holds the fibres together. As well as prevents the wadding from being pulled apart. Wadding without scrim-coating is softer, but not as durable. Marent crafts also offers a Fire-Retardant wadding in 5 different weights.

What is interfacing and interlining?

The terms interlining and interfacing are often used interchangeably in sewing. The primary function of interfacing is to provide strength, shape and stability around different parts of a garment such as collars, cuffs and buttonholes. Interlining comes in a variety of weights and may be sew-on or fusible (that is they stick to the outer fabric by heating). As these products are non-woven fabric, they will not fray so you can trim them after sewing. This includes bonding if necessary. The trade name in the UK is Vilene/Vliesilene. The weight you require depends on exactly where you are using the interlining in your garment. Bondaweb is another fusible interfacing which is suitable for fancy appliques and repairs.

9 Steps to Becoming a Sewing Master

We’ve even been kind enough to create a video which showcase 9 top sewing skills you need to be a master so be sure to check it out below!

What is bias binding tape?

Bias binding tape, or sometimes known as bias tape or simply bias binding, is used for binding seams, creating piping. For example on the edges of cushions or for finishing raw edges and detail on garments. Such as across pocket tops or around armholes or the neckline. It comes in a variety of colours and is may also be used to create button loops or drawstrings for bags. Bias binding is a highly versatile product and Marent Crafts offers a choice of 10 colours in a 12.5mm width. 

Bias Binding

What is Texacro?

You’ve most likely heard of Velcro which is an adhesive product that uses a repositionable hook and loop system to enable you to stick two pieces of fabric together. It’s also used to fasten and undo the Velcro many times over the lifetime of the product. Texacro is also made by Velcro, but is a lower quality, less expensive version which lasts for around 1,000 cycles of put together-pull apart. Compared to the premium Velcro product which lasts up to 10,000 cycles on average.

Velcro and Texacro are made from nylon and polyester. They come either black or white and in a range of widths to suit a variety of projects. Velcro is often used instead of zips, buttons or laces. It was made famous by NASA in the 1960s when it was used to fasten down pens and other items during Apollo missions. Here at Marent we offer both Velcro and its less expensive cousin Texacro.

So, there are you have it, a quick tour around some commonly used sewing products. We recommend Stitchless TV, a YouTube channel which takes you right from the basics of learning how to sew.

Next time, we’ll take a look at the wonderful world of sewing machines and how to create fancy stitches.

Make sure to follow us on Social Media for all our latest updates!

Here is one of our client reviews.